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Today Is A BIG Day For Sarah Huckabee Sanders – CONGRATS!

We are happy to report to you that Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders turns 36 today.

Sarah Elizabeth Huckabee Sanders is political aide by trade. Currently, she is the Deputy Press Secretary for President Donald Trump’s Administration, and she also serves as the Deputy Assistant to the President.

Sarah got her start in politics as a field coordinator for her father Mike Huckabee’s 2002 gubernatorial re-election campaign in Arkansas. She has over the years evolved into a prominent political aide serving several politicians at different point of time. She served as an Ohio field director during the presidential campaign of George W. Bush and then went on to play the role of the national political director during her father’s 2008 failed presidential campaign. The presidential run of Tim Pawlenty in 2012 also employed her as a senior advisor.

She was also the campaign manager of John Boozman in his race to the US Senate from Arkansas. She managed her father’s presidential campaign in 2016 and immediately after that was over she signed on as the senior advisor to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. While there she tackled campaigns liaison for coalitions.

She is a founding partner of the general consultation service provider ‘Second Street Strategies’ in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Here is more on Sanders Via Politico:

“To truly appreciate Sarah Huckabee Sanders, you first must appreciate what the job did to Sean Spicer. A longtime political trench fighter and Republican National Committee veteran, he combusted under the pressure of delivering Trump’s message. The job required him to lie, his answers were picked apart, and he got caught up in the infighting of the early Trump White House. “There used to be a process that everything followed, and I think that rulebook went out the door,” Spicer says. Everything in the Trump White House, he says, was harder. “You pick the variable, it’s times 10.”

Sanders did not come from Washington, or from institutional politics at all—she spent years learning from a very different rulebook. Trump was not the first charismatic, populist conservative she worked for. The other one put her on the job at age 9.

In 1992, her father, Mike Huckabee, ran his first statewide campaign, as a Republican for U.S. Senate from Arkansas. “From the time she was in elementary school, she saw politics up close and personal,” Huckabee says. “She was involved in it, everything from going with me to campaign on weekends and passing out fliers at county fairs.”

The pastor-turned-candidate would hand his daughter $5 and a stack of fliers, and tell her that once all the fliers were gone, she could treat herself to some cotton candy or a ride. That first campaign did not go well, but he came back a year later to win a special election for lieutenant governor, and then the year after that to defend his seat. It marked his third statewide campaign in three years. Sarah was 11. “She was always wanting to be in the room,” Huckabee recalls. “I can remember her standing around the kitchen table listening to Dick Morris explain crosstabs.”

Sanders wasn’t shielded from the unpleasant side of the business. “Arkansas politics were pretty brutal,” Huckabee says, recounting the personal attacks he faced in a still-Democratic state that had recently been governed by Bill Clinton. And then, there was the glare of the press. When the teenage Sarah got in a car crash, it made the papers. Huckabee, who would go on to serve as governor for a decade, thought the broadcast media was fair, but, in his view, “the print press in Arkansas were pretty slanted, and for the most part overwhelmingly pro-Democrat.”

As her friend Leslie Rutledge, a former Huckabee staffer who is now Arkansas attorney general, put it, “She lived a press briefing every single day as a child.”

Whatever came, the family rallied around the patriarch, and Sarah walked closely in his footsteps. In high school at Little Rock Central, she joined the mock trial and debate clubs, and was named secretary of the Arkansas Federation of Teenage Republicans. “We chose her because she was capable,” one member said at the time. “It just so happens that she’s also the governor’s daughter.” Then she attended his alma mater, Ouachita Baptist University, in Arkadelphia, Arkansas, and, while there, worked on his 2002 reelection campaign as a field coordinator. That year, spurred on by her dad, she also enlisted as the lead plaintiff in a voting rights case. An area judge had stripped college students of their right to vote in local elections, and Sanders signed on with the ACLU to fight the ruling. They won, freeing hundreds of students on the conservative Christian campus to vote for Mike Huckabee.

In another person, such a record might seem transparently ambitious. But that’s not what Sanders was like, says her former political science professor, Hal Bass. “She was a delight to be with, she was fun. … She smiled, she was witty,” Bass says. “I think you don’t see a lot of that in her public persona now.”

That’s quite the resume for only a 36-year-old. Who knows how much further she will go. Although I’m not sure if after being President Trump’s Press Secretary she might not end up resigning altogether since she has to deal with a man-child such as Jim Acosta from CNN on a daily basis and other people from the press who’s the only goal is to stop President Trump’s agenda at every corner instead of just doing what they are supposed to do, report the news.

 

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